Requirements Document Alphabet Soup – Explained

Michael Shrivathsan explains the meanings of the six key acronyms that relate to requirements documents in this blog entry. The terms and his summary definitions are:
  1. BRD – A Business Requirements Document (BRD) focuses on defining the business needs of a project. The BRD identifies one or more business problems faced by customers that can be solved by the company’s product. It then proposes a solution – usually a new product or enhancement to an existing product to address these problems.
  2. MRD – Market Requirements Document (MRD) focuses on defining the market requirements for a proposed new product or enhancement to an existing product.
  3. PRD – A Product Requirements Document (PRD) focuses on defining the product requirements for a proposed new product or enhancement to an existing product. Whereas the MRD focuses on requirements from the perspective of market needs, PRD focuses on requirements from the perspective of the product itself. It usually delves into more details on features and functional requirements, and may also include screen shots and user interface flows.
  4. FSD – A Functional Specifications Document (FSD) defines the complete details of a product’s functional requirements with a focus on implementation. FSD may define the product specifications screen by screen and feature by feature. This is a document that can be directly used by engineers to create the product.
  5. PSD – Product Specifications Document (PSD) is a less popular acronym, but in organizations that have such a document, it is by and large the same as the Functional Specifications Document (FSD) described above.
  6. SRS – A Software Requirements Specification (SRS) is another less popular acronym. In organizations that create an SRS, it has contents and details somewhere close to what is described above for PRD or FSD.
Read the rest of Michael’s post at the following link:
Requirements Document Alphabet Soup – Explained by Michael Shrivathsan

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